SOLC 2018-Day 17: Stories on My Windowsill

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March 2018 SOLC–Day 17
A huge thank you to Two Writing Teachers for all that they do to create an amazing community of writers and a safe, welcoming space to write, learn, share and grow.
http://www.twowritingteachers.org

I tend toward clutter and like to collect all sorts of objects.  In fact, one of my son’s high school friends once told me, “Your house is the messiest house I know. But in a really good way.” (I’m still not sure how I should have reacted to that one!)

Looking out of the kitchen window during a recent snowstorm, I realized that my windowsill holds a lot of stories. If visitors came into my house and looked at that windowsill, they would see an assortment of objects.

gerber.jpgThey’d see… a gerber daisy blooming, a bright splash of color against the wintry landscape on the other side of the window panes.

But they wouldn’t know…that my daughters gave it to me for Mother’s Day last year and that it’s blossomed three times and each bloom warms my heart.

 

sand dollars.jpgThey’d see… a small nest with two sand dollars resting inside it.

But they wouldn’t know…that the nest mysteriously appeared on our back porch one summer day and cupping it in my hands, I carefully carried it inside. Then I found the sand dollars on my favorite beach, lit by the rays of the rising sun. The quirky juxtaposition of the two,  appealed to me–ocean meets sky,  both reminders of the joy and peace I find in nature.

plant2.jpgThey’d see… an oddly-shaped plant

But they wouldn’t know …that once it looked like this.dead plant.jpg

 

Despite all odds, it lived and in its small way, is a symbol of optimism and tenacity. I even wrote about a slice about it (here).

yogurt container.jpgThey’d see …a small purple jar with paintbrushes in it.

But they wouldn’t know… that the jar was carefully wrapped in T-shirts and transported from Paris to Rome to Dublin and then back to Maine. In Paris it was a yogurt container. Here it holds paintbrushes and memories.

So many stories linger within these seemingly random items. A visitor might wonder, or dismiss them all as clutter. They’d see the items, but they’d never know all the stories that live on my windowsill.

 

 

44 thoughts on “SOLC 2018-Day 17: Stories on My Windowsill

  1. I love the structure of this piece…they’d see, but they wouldn’t know…
    Memories are what make objects important to us. Your post gives me ideas for writing too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      Thanks! I’m finding that the more I write, the more I’m realizing just how important the right structure is. Now that we’re empty nesters, I’m struggling with how to deal with all the items in my house that are imbued with memories. My husband wants to cleanse and I want to cling!

      Like

  2. Love the structure and content. Your title had me thinking it was going to be about a vase of flowers making you remember that one day spring will indeed come. It was so much more. And I smile everytime I look at the seashell on my windowsill, remembering a lovely day and a fun walk with my husband. You made me smile this morning.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      I love those items that evoke strong memories. The structure for this evolved so naturally–I was thinking about the need to clean off the window sill and then as I looked at each item, I realized there were stories there. And a slice was born! (and the window sill remains cluttered! lol)

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I was writing with another blogger about our touchstones. Love this blog. Stay messy!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. jcareyreads says:

    I also loved the structure. It got me thinking of my window sill. I enjoyed the story of your objects.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Yesterday I literally took a picture of a book with the title Every Object Has A Story (from the Royal Ontario Museum). I was musing about how to use that idea and – boom! You’ve done it. I love the idea of what we see vs what we know. And I really appreciated the nest with the sand dollars – and the tenacious plants!

    Liked by 2 people

    • mbhmaine says:

      I think that participating in Laura Shovan’s daily ekphrastic poetry challenge in February primed me to look a little deeper at the objects in my home. The book you photographed really has the perfect title for this post.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. paulabourque says:

    This is a so beautiful-now I am looking around the clutter in my house with less hostility! haaa
    But seriously, this is a great structure. I’m going to add this to Michelle Haseltine’s padlet of SOL ideas and structures

    Padlet上的创作

    Liked by 1 person

  7. cindaroo42 says:

    I love this structure!!! It really paints the picture of your home, but how important all of the objects are! At the same time, if something doesn’t have deeper meaning, should I get rid of it? I definitely want to try it as a slice!

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      Once again, Cindy, you pose the perfect question. I also have many things in my home with not much meaning but that bring me joy–others that just add to the clutter. Maybe there’s a memory or joy litmus test? By the way, it occurs to me that your wooden tulips are one of those story-imbued objects. 🙂

      Like

  8. glenda funk says:

    All those items are a symbol of a life well lived. I’m reminded that treasures are personal and each tells a story.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. aggiekesler says:

    I really love how you’ve told the stories this way. The pictures really add to the piece. The yogurt jar is really cool!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Judy Curtiss says:

    I often find it amazing what objects tell about us, if only they could talk. I enjoyed how you wrote the different perspectives.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I found you:) My turn:) I love that you have clutter. I do too. Many do not know the stories behind items. I like how the pictures brought the items to life. Definitely bookmarking for future writing. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. margaretsmn says:

    Once again, your structure inspires. What they see, what they don’t see. I want to do this. I love how “ocean meets sky” in your home.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I love the poetry of They’d see … But they wouldn’t know…

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Elana Waugh says:

    I love the way you structured this piece. I am adding the idea to a list of growing ideas that my students can slice about. It also reminds me that we truly don’t know the story behind things until the holder decides to tell it.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. terierrol says:

    I love the stories behind your objects and how you unfolded each one for us.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Suzanne says:

    Wonderful! Our stories live in the objects we choose to surround ourselves in! I will look at things in a whole different way now by thinking, “What they wouldn’t know…”

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Christine says:

    I have a few odd items around that I can’t get rid of because they have stories behind them – stories that only have meaning to me.
    I am sure each piece could be it’s own slice!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. arjeha says:

    If objects could talk it would be amazing to hear the stories they would tell. What is clutter to one is fond memories to another.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I am a person who struggles with clutter and mess. I am finding ART in your clutter. Thanks for the perspective! Mark

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Stacey Taylor says:

    I love the message in this post. It’s another way to say “don’t judge a book by its cover” (don’t judge a house by its clutter). Your stories are so interesting and make each object even more beautiful. Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Thanks for sharing “The items on My Windowsill” with us. Now I want to know the story of journey of the paintbrushes. Would you tell it soon please?

    Like

  22. I love how you structured this post. I think I might have to try that. My husband likes to collect ‘little things’ as you goes through this life and they drive me nuts! Your slice makes me think that I should try looking at them through his eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. […] but all these things he wants to trash/sell/giveaway come with memories attached. (See slices here, […]

    Like

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