Balancing the View

slice-of-life_individual

Looking at downloaded pictures the other day, I realized that I hadn’t taken any scenic views recently or even pictures that gave much context by including surroundings. In fact, during the past few weeks, I’ve been using my zoom lens almost exclusively.  It struck me suddenly that this reflects my experience of the world these days.

DSC_0184.jpg

I mean, honestly, who wants to spend a lot of time checking out the bigger picture right now? It’s pretty daunting. So, I’ve been choosing to deliberately narrow my focus rather than look at the big picture. My survival strategy, in large part, has been to focus exclusively on what’s immediately in front of me. Getting through the days, moment by moment.

By necessity, we’ve all done this a bit. Most of us are at home most of the time, and seldom head out. At our house, it was noon today before we even noticed that a tree had fallen and blocked our driveway during last night’s winds. There was no sense of urgency about taking care of it. I mean, who’s going anywhere?

Apparently this limited lens has transferred to my photography as well. So now, even when taking pictures, I’m avoiding looking at the bigger picture.

As I pondered this, it struck me that when you look only at what’s right in front of you, you might lose your perspective. You might also lose track of the journey, or the path you’re taking and its ultimate destination. That struck me as problematic.

So, when we went for a walk on Saturday afternoon. I purposefully changed lenses, literally and figuratively. I challenged myself to look at the big picture. Not to ignore the fascinating and distracting small details, but to lift my eyes more often to the bigger view. To keep an eye on the trail ahead and pay attention to the scenery around me.

Ultimately, I suppose, it’s all about balance. We don’t know what the future will bring, but living life exclusively on zoom seems a bit limited and maybe not too healthy. It is helpful to have some idea of the approaching landscape, after all. So, I’ll begin with my photography and see if it transfers over to my daily life. Then, if I get really brave, maybe I’ll start listening to the news again.

DSC_0572.jpg

DSC_0590.jpg

DSC_0599.jpg

31 thoughts on “Balancing the View

  1. Gail Aldous says:

    Molly, I totally get where you’re coming from. Each of us has to do what’s right for each of us at the time it is right for us. Seems like you’re doing well. Getting out in nature focusing on small details and the big picture both help me.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Gail Aldous says:

    I forgot to say I love both of you small detailed and big picture pics!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. JudyK /J Koval says:

    Your photography is GORGEOUS, and your writing is not only beautiful, but so insightful! I’m glad I caught your post today. Thanks for making me think! 🙂 ~JudyK

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What gorgeous photos! That idea of using the zoom lens exclusively in our lives right now is so fascinating to think about. It’s such an interesting metaphor. The double meaning of Zoom in this line: “living life exclusively on zoom seems a bit limited and maybe not too healthy” was also interesting and gave me a little bit of a chuckle.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. notthewholestory says:

    Happy I stumbled upon you today! It’s interesting that I’ve been thinking/seeing with this “zoom-lens-focus” in different parts of my apartment/habits/relationships, etc. I do love the way you noticed that you’d been seeing things in this way in both your photography and the world. The way you capture this in your writing and in your photography is beautiful. I think so much of life right now is just getting through each day and focusing in on what’s important at this moment, on this day, and it’s hard to look at the bigger picture. Thank you for reminding me that we have a choice!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. cvarsalona says:

    Molly, this was a fabulous piece of writing that shared your feelings of life during the quarantine. We all need balance. For the time being, seeing life through the zoom lens may be the best route to take. It is difficult to hone into the big picture because no one knows what that will look like. Your nature photos are so sharp and beautiful. You have such an amazing collection here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      Thanks, Carol. Taking photos has been another survival technique and with spring in the air, there’s so much to see!

      Liked by 1 person

      • cvarsalona says:

        Molly, I am staring at your bird photos with wonder. I have not been able to capture the birds outside my window with clarity. May I use your bird in the upper right corner for a poem I am composing? Of course, I will give you credit and place it in my Nature Nurtures 2020 Gallery.

        Liked by 1 person

        • mbhmaine says:

          Of course you can, Carol! Thanks for asking. By the way, I have loads of bird photos that don’t turn out well, too! I just don’t share those! lol In case you’re interested, this is a hermit thrush.

          Liked by 1 person

  7. Yes. I hear you 100%. Shifting into a larger view, at a manageable pace, is a good first step. Feel free to hold off on listening to the news as long as you need to, though! Thank you for these gorgeous Spring pictures.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Anna Maria says:

    Your photos are stunning! The eagle one is my favorite. You do pose a very true statement. It really is about balance. I think there are days we need to keep the zoom lens on because of just how overwhelming the world is right now. And yet by taking a step back to see the bigger picture sometimes you’ll read or see something that your heart just needs to witness.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Debbie Lynn says:

    I love your analogy between your life and photography. Beautiful photos and encouraging philosophy! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. You live in paradise! Get this MOlly a musuem gallery. Or, at least a wall. Love. Everything. Expect to read/look here, some much more. Stunning.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      Thanks so much, Jan. I feel so lucky to live in Maine. The older I get, the more I treasure time outdoors and photography is a fun way to add another level of enjoyment to it.

      Like

  11. janicescully says:

    You’ve captured so much beauty in your photos. There is something about looking at a small bird close up, the way it opens its mouth and how it might move–you capture it. Focusing on small things when the big picture of the world is so uncertain is comforting.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Really! Listen to the news again! Save yourself. Don’t. Our state rep Patty Hymansen (you can get on her mailing list) sends us directives from the Maine CDC and the federal CDC. The Sunday Times had an entire section on what you can do to thrive in this Time of Corona. Be in service to otherswas first on the list. Funny, you wrote all about taking in the larger picture and I totally connected to one sentence, the last one! Any interest in writing to a prompt for 250-300 words for a West Coast radio station, well north of San Francisco, near Mendocino? Just thought I’d ask. It’s similar ten minute writing experiments I had you all do to find a subject.

    Liked by 1 person

    • mbhmaine says:

      If it isn’t too late, and you can send me the info about the prompt, I’ll definitely check it out. With all the time I spend on my computer these days, I find it hard to manage my personal e-mails, blog, etc. I’m way behind on responding to everything! I’m hoping to catch up this week.

      Like

  13. cvarsalona says:

    Molly, I would love to see your other bird photos at some time. Thanks for letting me use your photo. The post is at https://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2020/04/wednesday-thoughts-quarantine-life.html.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Beautiful photos, Molly – and such a thoughtful post.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s